RED HOT Contributors

 

Conservatives scoff at bipartisan health bill

0

The Senate’s bipartisan health bill is a “nonstarter” in the House without significant changes, conservative lawmakers said Tuesday. 

“A compromise would be subsidies to stabilize the markets but somehow injecting competition in such a way that prices and premiums could come down,” said Rep. Dave Brat (R-Va.), a member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus. 

ADVERTISEMENT

“If you answer that problem, solve that problem, then we’re open to that conversation. But right now, it’s a nonstarter,” he said.

The bill, sponsored by Sens. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderChildren’s health-care bill faces new obstacles Overnight Health Care: Schumer calls for tying ObamaCare fix to children’s health insurance | Puerto Rico’s water woes worsen | Dems plead for nursing home residents’ right to sue Schumer calls for attaching ObamaCare fix to children’s health insurance MORE (R-Tenn.) and Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayChildren’s health-care bill faces new obstacles Overnight Health Care: Schumer calls for tying ObamaCare fix to children’s health insurance | Puerto Rico’s water woes worsen | Dems plead for nursing home residents’ right to sue Schumer calls for attaching ObamaCare fix to children’s health insurance MORE (D-Wash.), would fund ObamaCare’s insurer subsidies for two years and give states more flexibility to change their ObamaCare programs. 

But some House conservatives argue Congress shouldn’t fund the payments because they’re a “bailout” for insurance companies.

“We haven’t cut taxes yet, we haven’t repealed ObamaCare yet… but we’re now going to bail out insurance companies? You have to be kidding me. ” said Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), the former chairman of the caucus.

“Of course we’re opposed to that legislation,” he said. 

The subsidies, called cost-sharing reductions, reimburse insurers for giving discounted deductibles and co-pays to low-income customers. 

But conservatives, frustrated after Congress’s failure to repeal ObamaCare, have been reluctant to support a bill that would fund them. 

“You know who’s hurting under ObamaCare is the American people, not the insurance companies,” said Rep. Mark Walker (R-N.C.), chairman of the conservative Republican Study Committee caucus.

“As long as we draft legislation that continues … bailing out or propping those guys up, I think we’re going to continue to miss the mark,” he said.

Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamDurbin: I had ‘nothing to do’ with Curbelo snub Republicans jockey for position on immigration Overnight Health Care: House passes 20-week abortion ban | GOP gives ground over ObamaCare fix | Price exit sets off speculation over replacement MORE (R-S.C.) and Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyBen Shapiro: Who died and made Jimmy Kimmel Jesus? Dems look to turn ObamaCare tables on GOP in ’18 Congress misses deadline to reauthorize childrens’ health care program MORE (R-La.), who both support the bipartisan bill, said last week they’re working to make changes to the bill to win support in the House. 

Those changes likely wouldn’t be supported by Democrats, however. 

The Trump administration canceled the subsidies earlier this month, arguing they were being made illegally. 

While the bill appears to have enough support to pass the Senate,  leaders have said the bill won’t be brought up for a vote on the floor without approval from Trump, who has said he wants to make conservative changes to the bill. 

About

We Support OUR Contributors

Get Our Newsletter

 Receive podcast updates
Exclusive insights
Patient Engagement Tips from industry experts
We hate SPAM as much as you do and promise to keep your email address safe.
  • Subscribe to the Podcast